TextMate Grammars

Bookmark of Where to find a list of scopes for Sublime2 (or textMate?)

Thanks to Phrogz

comment

for comments.

line

line comments, we specialize further so that the type of comment start character(s) can be extracted from the scope.

double-slash
// comment
double-dash
-- comment
number-sign
# comment
percentage
% comment
character
other types of line comments.
block

multi-line comments like /* … */ and .

documentation
embedded documentation.
constant

various forms of constants.

numeric

those which represent numbers, e.g. 42, 1.3f, 0x4AB1U.

character

those which represent characters, e.g. <, \e, \031.

escape
escape sequences like \e would be constant.character.escape.
language

constants (generally) provided by the language which are “special” like true, false, nil, YES, NO, etc.

other

other constants, e.g. colors in CSS.

entity

an entity refers to a larger part of the document, for example a chapter, class, function, or tag. We do not scope the entire entity as entity.* (we use meta.* for that). But we do use entity.* for the “placeholders” in the larger entity, e.g. if the entity is a chapter, we would use entity.name.section for the chapter title.

name

we are naming the larger entity.

function
the name of a function.
type
the name of a type declaration or class.
tag
a tag name.
section
the name is the name of a section/heading.
other

other entities.

inherited-class
the superclass/baseclass name.
attribute-name
the name of an attribute (mainly in tags).
invalid

stuff which is “invalid”.

illegal
illegal, e.g. an ampersand or lower-than character in HTML (which is not part of an entity/tag).
deprecated
for deprecated stuff e.g. using an API function which is deprecated or using styling with strict HTML.
keyword

keywords (when these do not fall into the other groups).

control
mainly related to flow control like continue, while, return, etc.
operator
operators can either be textual (e.g. or) or be characters.
other
other keywords.
markup

this is for markup languages and generally applies to larger subsets of the text.

underline

underlined text.

link
this is for links, as a convenience this is derived from markup.underline so that if there is no theme rule which specifically targets markup.underline.link then it will inherit the underline style.
bold

bold text (text which is strong and similar should preferably be derived from this name).

heading

a section header. Optionally provide the heading level as the next element, for example markup.heading.2.html for

in HTML.

italic

italic text (text which is emphasized and similar should preferably be derived from this name).

list

list items.

numbered
numbered list items.
unnumbered
unnumbered list items.
quote

quoted (sometimes block quoted) text.

raw

text which is verbatim, e.g. code listings. Normally spell checking is disabled for markup.raw.

other

other markup constructs.

meta

the meta scope is generally used to markup larger parts of the document. For example the entire line which declares a function would be meta.function and the subsets would be storage.type, entity.name.function, variable.parameter etc. and only the latter would be styled. Sometimes the meta part of the scope will be used only to limit the more general element that is styled, most of the time meta scopes are however used in scope selectors for activation of bundle items. For example in Objective-C there is a meta scope for the interface declaration of a class and the implementation, allowing the same tab-triggers to expand differently, depending on context.

storage

things relating to “storage”.

type
the type of something, class, function, int, var, etc.
modifier
a storage modifier like static, final, abstract, etc.
string

strings.

quoted

quoted strings.

single
single quoted strings: ‘foo’.
double
double quoted strings: “foo”.
triple
triple quoted strings: “”“Python”“”.
other
other types of quoting: $‘shell’, %s{…}.
unquoted

for things like here-docs and here-strings.

interpolated

strings which are “evaluated”: date, $(pwd).

regexp

regular expressions: /(\w+)/.

other

other types of strings (should rarely be used).

support

things provided by a framework or library should be below support.

function
functions provided by the framework/library. For example NSLog in Objective-C is support.function.
class
when the framework/library provides classes.
type
types provided by the framework/library, this is probably only used for languages derived from C, which has typedef (and struct). Most other languages would introduce new types as classes.
constant
constants (magic values) provided by the framework/library.
variable
variables provided by the framework/library. For example NSApp in AppKit.
other
the above should be exhaustive, but for everything else use support.other.
variable

variables. Not all languages allow easy identification (and thus markup) of these.

parameter
when the variable is declared as the parameter.
language
reserved language variables like this, super, self, etc.
other
other variables, like $some_variables.